Posts Tagged ‘34 Ford’

Faithful readers will recall our last episode, when our plucky hero (that would me) was left in a pickle.  Carburetor linkage that didn’t fit, brake hoses the wrong size, a driveshaft tunnel in the frame that wouldn’t clear the shaft and similarly flat floor.  

Did we mention the owner of the driveline local shop hurt his back and couldn’t make the driveshaft?

Well, the Cavalry arrived (in the form of the UPS truck)!  Steering shaft support bearing and bracket made and mounted!  Throttle linkage fabricated, looks and works beautifully!  Driveshaft tunnel in the frame modified and new floor tunnel in progress (thanks to another chunk of cardboard shipping tube and a yard of fiberglass mat my friend Steve [Mutant Brothers] gave me),and new brake hoses from the local NAPA store! 



And yet, he persevered.

img_2201I got the instructions for the ’34 Roadster the other day, so I jumped right in on it!  Sadly, I repeated what I used to with model cars, and the full size equivalent of getting glue on the windshield, and am now mopping up the mess.

I had ordered some 5/8″ LH jamb nuts for the front shock links from Speedway Motors, and some rear shock mount steps.  The order came today, and all excited to hook my Houdaille front shocks, I made the connector link (5/8″ LH all thread) and opened the pack of jamb nuts.  They wouldn’t screw on, and it was obvious when I looked, they were RH jamb nuts.  On top of that, I only ordered one shock stud, thinking they came in pairs, so a couple of errors on that order.  I need to get some steering shaft and a couple of U-joints anyway, so it can be steered, so I’ll be calling tonight to set things righ

Meanwhile, the trans tunnel  I made out of cardboard is ‘glassed, it looks and fits fine.  I succumbed to peer pressure and swapped the single 4 bbl. intake and Holley carb for the ancient Offy 2-4 intake and the pair of Edelbrock 500 carbs I bought for it.  I ordered a small diameter electronic distributor, wires and coil which should be here tomorrow, so that’ll be ready to fire up.

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Finally!  The 283 is nestled permanently between the frame rails!  It was a bigger job than I’d anticipated, since I’d had things only loosely assembled before, I had to move the bolt holes back on the engine mount pads on the frame a quarter inch, but it’s good to go now.

I think the cream color firewall with the three gauges looks incredible, and the low mount alternator gets rid of that ugly lump up on top of the engine.  I opted to leave the single 4-bbl Edelbrock Perfomer intake on for now, I’ll put one of the new 500 CFM E-carbs on and get the thing sorted out before I tackle getting dual quads sorted out on a 283.  One thing at a time…

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I have enough cream enamel left to paint the ’59 T’bird wheel, which will tie that into the color scheme.  I dig the red engine and polished aluminum against the cream firewall, and the little dual quad air filter element looks better than the bug ugly chrome air cleaner the engine came with.  It’s starting to come together.

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When the tires were mounted on the Dayton wheels, the high pressure blast used to seat the bead blasted a couple big hunks of chrome off the right front rim.  I was bummed, but had been considering media blasting and paint the wheels anyway.  Then, a buddy suggested a product called “Rub and Buff”, sold in hobby shops as an ersatz silver leaf.  Probably powdered aluminum in a waxy base, the stuff worked amazingly well.  From five feet away, it’s almost impossible to spot the “repair”.  I’ll probably end up getting one new wheel from Dayton Wheel, but for now, I’m good to go.  The car is going to sport some light “patina” overall, so, this isn’t out of place.

I’m getting excited.

17861698_10213285226827831_7196399856735939171_nThe first, and I mean the FIRST guy who asks if this is “…one of those kit-cars…” is going to get one of these bronze windshield posts shoved right up his arse.  Up until yesterday, I had the posts and windshield frame just loosely bolted on, and no hinge bushings in the posts, and it looked reasonably OK.

Until I tightened things down a little.

Then everything was all kinds of off.  The left had post stood up several degrees more vertical than the passenger side, and didn’t lay right against the cowl.  The windshield bound in the  pivots with the bushings in, and the pivot stud would barely go through its hole in the (apparently twisted) left side post.

It was awful.

I ended up spending the afternoon getting these reproduction posts to fit the cowl of the who-knows-how-old, unknown maker fiberglass body, and accept the original, but chopped two inches, windshield frame.  Some (OK, a LOT) of “finessing” with a 4″ angle grinder on the bottom of the post flange, a little work with a hole saw to allow the mounting bolt some wiggle room, some time clamped in the vise with some precision re-shaping with a big Crescent wrench, and “Ding-Ding-Ding”, we have a winner.

That was after I made new brackets on the cowl brace to move the steering column two inches to the left and down a half an inch because the wheel was in the wrong place, and the brake pedal hit it.

This car has been a series of challenges to make things fit properly.  I started with the doors.  Broken hinges.  Poorly mounted latch hardware.  Nowhere near enough bracing.  Turnbuckles to twist the doors into submission.  Shimming the body on the frame for gaps.  Remounting and aligning the rumble lid hinges.  Filling and finessing the fit of the rumble lid to the body and tulip panel.  Making cowl to frame mounts (a vital part of old Ford body alignment that this car never had).  Getting the Rootlieb hood to fit the Argentine reproduction grill shell, and then getting the hood to fit the cowl AND the grill shell at the same time.  The splash aprons, which are still going to need a bunch of Mar-Glas and ‘glass mat and resin to fit  properly.

And that’s just the body.  I built the frame too, not having ever dealt with a buggy sprung Ford chassis before.

It’s been humbling, but fun, and great therapy.  I’m actually a little sorry to have it close to paint and being done.  Except for doing the interior, and a new top, and trimming the trunk, and  the exhaust, and…

Hot Rod!

Posted: April 4, 2017 in Ford Roadsters, Uncategorized
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I finished up the headlight stands today and got the lovely splash aprons mounted below the hood.  Even though the hood is raw steel, the body is flat black and the splash aprons are purple, you can see the beautiful sweeping line of the hood, splash apron, headlight and tire make that flows down and back to the rear wheel.  The bottom of the body doesn’t lay flat on the frame like a ’32, but drops down  below the frame, to follow the hood line.  It’s beautiful, and it’s why I built a ’34 rather than a ’32, or the ’27 I was originally going to build.  I love it.17634448_10213207746090861_6471970211750891650_n17757432_10213205080984235_1940985273489453503_n17757509_10213207745850855_5432272209028145714_n17757562_10213207746570873_2864557533850458756_n

Baby steps, baby steps…

Posted: April 1, 2017 in Hot Rod
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It’s been almost two weeks since  I’ve had a chance to work on the ’34, but I had a couple hours to squeeze in today.  I put the radiator and grill shell on, mocked the hood up and got the panels aligned pretty well.  Had to drill new holes in the radiator mount pads on the frame, pushing the radiator back about half an inch at the bottom, but things line up pretty well.

Now, I can pull the radiator back off, and have the lower hose outlet moved to the passenger side (it’s a brand new Walker radiator that cam with the project, but it’s not set up for a Chevy engine), paint the firewall, and prep the body for paint.  The weather should improve pretty quickly and cooperate with my plan to get the car  painted by the end of April.  I hope…

I got started on the headlight stands, which I’m making from a pair of F100 shock mounts, but was interrupted by my parents furnace quitting and going up their place to try to restart that.  I’m using some ’37 Chevy commercial lights, which are pretty similar to ’36 Ford passenger car lights, with slightly less curved lenses.  They should look pretty good when I get them done.  Just different enough to be noticed, but not so different as to look out of place.

Stay tuned, lots of fun stuff coming up!

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17264607_10213002107110015_4801641248479683366_nThanks to my good friend Jake Moomey, who helped me with the new kingpin bushings, the ’34 chassis is now a roller!  I put the Ford 5 on 5 1/2 to Chev 5 on 4 3/4 wheel adaptors on the Buick drums, and bolted the 14″ Astro’s on for rollers, and resisted the temptation to set the engine in and drop the body on.  I DO have to put the engine in to run fuel lines, and I’m going to try my hand at building my own exhaust system, but it has to come back out before the body goes on to stay.